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20121129
20121207
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
night and every day. moments ago, speaker of the house john boehner said this. >> the white house spent three weeks trying to develop a proposal. they call for $1.6 trillion in new taxes. calling for not even $400 billion in cuts, and they want to have this extra spending that is actually greater than the amount that we would cut. i mean, it is not a serious proposal. so right now we are almost nowhere. megyn: alan colmes and lars larson are with us now. let's just focus on this debt ceiling. the reason we find ourselves about to go off the fiscal cliff with the automatic spending cuts, in part is because back in 2011, they wanted to raise the debt ceiling and the republicans said you cannot do it unless we do spending cuts. we cannot just do deficit spending. so they agree, they cut this deal, now the democrats are going to the republicans and saying, forget that. let's just in the position to get rid of it. what on earth would make them think that republicans would agree to that? >> because the president thinks he has a mandate from the whole country. he thinks he can get anything he
our economy. >> reporter: republicans led by house speaker john boehner says he should quit campaigning and take care of the business at hand. republicans say they are willing to consider raising more revenue but they want to see spending cuts to go along with it. >> we need to hear they are willing to make spending cuts now, not promises of spending cuts sometime if the future. to me the tidal waves that are coming at us is social security and medicare and the new health care law. >> reporter: now house democratic leader nancy pelosi is calling the speakers to bring the tax to the floor by tuesday or she will try to force a vote. boehner is not likely to buckle under pressure so it seems like a standoff. >> gregg: sfuaf. what a surprise? they want to resolve this fiscal crisis or lack in his real compromise. john boehner is leading an attack on the lack of progress. >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. it was not a serious proposal. so right now we're almost nowhere. >> gregg: almost nowhere. how about that? staff writer for roll call joins us live. the preside
tougher in going after speaker john boehner's latest proposal in saying it simply doesn't add up. >> we don't know who pays. we don't know what we're talking about in terms of actual legislation to increase revenues. it's magic beans and fairy dust. >> the bottom line is the president and speaker boehner have not spoken now in several days. so there is really no signs of progress. there has been some discussion that look that's just happening in public. behind closed doors maybe they are gaining some ground, i have spoken to some top white house officials tonight some top republicans on the hill they say in private they are not making progress either, shep. >> shepard: republicans say they have offered some compromises. >> they have in the sense that speaker boehner with his policy late yesterday put $100 billion in new tax revenue on the table. that was a concession by him but not far enough as you noted for the white house because the white house wants him to not just raise tax revenue by limiting intuctions and loopholes and the like. they want to see tax rates go up but republic lea
? >> reporter: we heard from speaker john boehner who said that treasury secretary geithner did not come with a substantive plan in terms of spending cuts. we know the republicans were hoping when the treasury secretary came here to capitol hill, that he would have laid out some serious spending cuts because the republicans are saying if we're putting revenue on the table, we need to see some serious spending cuts from the white house. i think it's important to note the difference between what is said in public and what is said in private. these meetings are held in private. in public lawmakers are sounding a little tougher. here's the senate majority leader on the senate floor earlier today. >> for four months house republicans have refused to act. instead, they've held the middle class hostage to protect the richest 2% of taxpayers, people who enjoy a decade of ballooning income and shrinking tax bills. >> reporter: so that is the public sentiment from the senate majority leader, blasting the republicans for not passing the tax cuts for the middle class. in private, though, it sounds l
in just 33 days. in a scathing assessment today, the speaker of the house john boehner says there's been no substantive progress on a deal. need to realize there can be no deal without tax rates going up for top earners. let's go live to our chief white house correspondent jessica yellin. she's got more on the latest developments. tough talk from both sides, jessica. >> reporter: tough talk and some bright lines, wolf. on the same day that treasury secretary tim geithner went to capitol hill to meet with both democrats and republicans to talk about these negotiations, there is tense body language and tough words on both sides of pennsylvania avenue. they're starting to sound dug-in on capitol hill. >> all eyes are on the white house. the country doesn't need a victory lap. it needs leadership. >> reporter: at the white house. >> this is available not just here but to everyone in the world who has an internet connection. and i know things are done the old fashioned way sometimes on capitol hill, but i believe they have electricity and internet connections and they can get this. >> reporte
complain the new proposal from house speaker john boehner is too vague about tax increases even as it lays out a tough package of spending cuts. for instance raising medicare's eligibility age for the first time in the program's history most likely by two years from 65 to 67 the move would not apply to americans who are close to retirement now. it would be phased in for younger workers such as maggie, a virginia health club manager who just turned 50 last month. >> i think the biggest factor for me is when are you going to retire so you lose your insurance from work and if it goes to 67 you have this two- year gap. what are you going to do? >> reporter: when medicare was created in 1966, the average life expectancy for men was 67 years, today it's 76 and women live on average to 81. one recent study by the kaiser family foundation estimated that shifting medicare eligibility from 65 to 67 would save the federal government $5.7 billion a year. 65 and 66-year-olds would pay an extra $3.7 billion a year to ensure themselves. the employers would pay billions more. >> it would finally bankrupt
. here is speaker john boehner. >> i'm disappointed in where we are and disappointed in what's happened over the last couple weeks. going over the fiscal cliff is serious business and i'm here seriously trying to resolve it. and i would hope the white house would get serious as well. >> reporter: you had senate republican leader mitch mcconnell say after a meeting with geithner that he considered this is a step backward. and so all the rhetoric, all the talk here on capitol hill sounds pretty pessimistic at this point, guys. bill: we heard a little bit from chris van hollen. what is the latest reaction from democrats to republicans mike? melissa: democrats say if you don't like the president's plan, republicans where is your plan? where exactly are you going to generate more revenue. they're trying to draw the republicans out to put specifics out there in terms of what cuts they want to make to entitlements, feeling like that may hurt republican argument. bottom line, house democratic leader nancy pelosi says she thinks republicans will eventually see the light. melissa: why am i confid
. but at least the two sides are talking, by phone. not face to face. house speaker john boehner and the president are hoping to break the fiscal cliff ice. now we're just mixing metaphors, left and right. speaking on the phone, 26 days left, of course, until we tumble over the cliff or slide down the slope or fall off the precipice or however you want to put it. we could, of course, face massive tax hikes, spending cuts. that's what the fiscal cliff is all about. it would all start with the start of the new year. i want to get to senator jeff merkley. he's a democrat from the state of oregon. he's on both the budget committee and the banking, housing, and urban affairs committee. nice to have you with us, sir. thanks for joining us. >> you're welcome. >> thank you. before we get to fiscal cliff, let's talk a little bit about syria. there are now reports that they may be loading the components that would make up sarin gas. and i'm curious to know and i think a lot of people are watching this, does this mean that we are headed, the united states is headed into military action cons
and house speaker john boehner spoke about it on the phone with one another. that discussion came as treasury secretary tim geithner confirmed mr. obama is prepared to take the economy over the cliff unless republicans agree to raise tax rates on the wealthy. >>> meantime in georgia, some activists expressed frustration about the stalemate in holiday spirit. they delivered symbolic lumps of kill to the offices of both of their state's u.s. senators. security guard met them, at chambliss' office. a few were let inside without the camera and media present. of course. that would have been the real story. >> folks are upset now. see what happens january 1 after you get the first paycheck and go, oh, this is what the fiscal cliff meant. yeah. 2013. the next story involves a new grassroots campaign that is starting. meant to draw attention to the nation's debt crisis. it is our "favorite story of the day." the campaign is called -- "the can kicks back." aimed at young people and features former republican senator allen simpson, a rather spry allen simpson at that. >> stop instagraming y
the fiscal cliff. mr. obama and house speaker john boehner took a step yesterday, speaking about the standoff on the phone. i guess at least they weren't texting, right? while the details of their chat remain private, both men continued to talk past each other in public. >> let's allow higher rates to go up for the top 2%. >> there are ways to limit deductions, close loopholes, and have the same people pay more, more of their money to the federal government, without raising tax rates, which we believe will harm our economy. >> treasury secretary tim geithner also weighed in yesterday saying the president is willing to allow the nation to go over the cliff if republicans don't agree to raise taxes on the wealthy. >>> we are learning new details about colorado's shooting suspect james holmes now that thousands of e-mails in the case have been released. messages indicate holmes may have had a brief romantic relationship in the days before the tragedy. we have learned that in early june, holmes began specifically talking and fantasizing about killing a lot of people. his psychiatrist was so worri
they would achieve. house speaker john boehner inc insists his offer is the best one on the table calling it a credible plan that deserves serious consideration by the white house. jenna: mike emanuel is with us. certainly a challenge to find this ideal plan. what is holding it up. >> reporter: the chairman of the senate budget committee wants a large come proceed hence i have deal in the range of $5 trillion and says a grand bargain can get done if everybody kaoels cool and doesn't overreact to every valley over the net. he this is a camp david-style summit might help things move around. a senate republican told greta van susteren it's time to be honest about retirement benefits. >> you and i need to pay a little more into the system because we can afford it. that is the kind of entitlement reform we need. >> reporter: that gets older americans and their groups all worked up thinking you could be messing with their benefits. jenna: a hot toeupb hot topic, and taxes. it seems they need to have some sort of increase in taxes. how does that play out. >> reporter: the statement from the whit
what is really going on behind the scenes, which is real negotiating. so i asked that question of john boehner, who has been through this kind of negotiating many, many times over many years, if that's what we're seeing or if we're at a stalemate. listen to this . the past 24 hours, is this the necessary public posturing that needs to go on to get an endgame or is there serious stalemate right now? >> there is a stalemate. let's not kid ourselves. i'm not trying to make this more difficult, but if you watched me over the last three weeks, i've been very girded in what i have to say because i don't want to make it harder for me or the president or members of both parties to be able to find common ground. but when i come out the day after the election, and make it clear that republicans will put revenue on the table, i took a great risk. and then the white house spends three weeks trying to develop a proposal and they send one up here, they didn't want to have this extra spending that is actually greater than the amount they're willing to cut. i mean, it is -- it was not a serious propos
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)